New Books and Publications from Peywand Association

 

Dossier of Facts on the People's Mojahedin Organisation of Iran
by Karim Haggi Moni

Recent Human Rights Violations in the Mojahedin
by Massoud Tayebi

I come from the land of pain and suffering 'Abu-Ghurib Prison'
by Mohammad Hoseyn Sobhani

Available from:

Iran Peywand Association
PO Box 30068
6803 AB Arnhem
The Netherlands
 

email: k.haggimoni1@chello.nl

Dossier of Facts on the People's Mojahedin Organisation of Iran
by Karim Haggi Moni
This booklet contains the combined input of the experiences of tens of former members of the People's Mojahedin Organisation of Iran (PMOI). All were either members or cadres. Some were from the higher ranks of leadership in the organisation. Some had achieved membership of the Central Committee of the organisation. Some were in Mojahedin bases in Iraq up to the time of the Gulf war in 1991. Others were there as recently as January 2002. Their experiences relate to the activities of the Mojahedin's National Liberation Army of Iran (NLA), its propaganda bureaux, or the Mojahedin's relationship with the Iraqis or their Military Staff headquarters. Most can trace their political affiliation with the Mojahedin for between fifteen to thirty years. Some had endured prison terms for their activities at the time of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Most also had experience of torture, violence, degradation and deprivation in prisons be it at the time of the monarchy, the Islamic regime or with the Mojahedin themselves. The wealth of experience and evidence proffered by these witnesses serves to complement what is already known about the methods of torture and interrogation used by the Islamic Republic since its establishment.
pp 154, full colour photographs
ISBN 907719603

Recent Human Rights Violations in the Mojahedin
by Massoud Tayebi

When the terrible events of September 11th occurred, it was almost two months after the beginning of the unfair trial of the disaffected members of the Mojahedin, those who wanted to leave the Mojahedin's base in Iraq.
On the day of September 11th, most of the National Liberation Army's staff were on duty in Bagher Zadeh Base, 60km west of Baghdad. It was sometime between 5p.m. and 6p.m. Baghdad local time when the event occurred. At that time, I, Massoud Tayebi, with another fifteen staff members, was in an Army Staff Headquarters meeting. An unprecedented phone call gave us the news that 'America has been bombarded!' Everyone was shocked and stood up from their chairs. The Chairman of the Army Staff Headquarters told us to leave our present location and go to the military base.
Twenty minutes after our arrival at the base, the news, tape recorded from CNN, was broadcast on the closed circuit television screen. The news had been translated so we learned about the horrible events that had happened; that the huge World Trade Center buildings had been attacked by terrorists, and that soon after, the Pentagon Building had also been attacked.
The Mojahedin began to 'party'. Loud music was broadcast from the loud speakers. Everyone was ready at the Mojahedin bases to sing 'Battle with America' or 'Nabard ba Amrika'. This song has been sung by the Mojahedin for over eighteen years.
pp 14.

I come from the land of pain and suffering 'Abu-Ghurib Prison'
by Mohammad Hoseyn Sobhani
As long as I was at Rajavi's jail, I was kept in solitary confinement which placed a great deal of emotional and psychological pressure on me. However, the overcrowded jails at Iraqi Intelligence and Security Organization were unbearable. They put 12 prisoners in a cell three meters by three meters.
The prisoners had to sleep on top of each other. Toilet and sink filled one third of the room. The walls of the cell were the colour of blood. The half-dark cell was lit only by a dim moonlight. This was in stark contrast to Rajavi's solitary confinement jail, where for four years I had to sleep with the light on every night. And anytime I was awakened by an onslaught of mosquitoes, suffocating heat or unbearable psychological pressure, I was not able to go back to sleep. The bright lamps would worsen the throbbing headache that I had to frequently endure.
pp 20.